Zulu

Written by Real author
As a child, Ali Neuman ran away from home to escape the Inkatha, a militant political party at war with the then-underground African National Congress. He and his mother are the only members of his family that survived the carnage of those years, and the psychological scars remain. READ MORE

The Patagonian Hare: A Memoir

Written by Claude Lanzmann
In his remarkable memoir, Claude Lanzmann offers a visionary testimonial of his own life and of eighty years of contemporary history. Born to a Jewish family in Paris in 1925, Lanzmann hid with his family in wartime France and joined the communist Resistance as a teenager. After the Liberation, he studied philosophy at the Sorbonne and met Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. READ MORE

Silly Lily and the Four Seasons

Written by Agnès Rosenstieh
Lilly is a spunky little girl who delights in the unexpected pleasures of each season, peering inside shells in the summer and tasting different kinds of apples in the fall. READ MORE

Pomelo Begins to Grow

Written by Ramona Badescu
What happens as a little one begins to grow? Are there growing pains? Do different parts of the body grow unequally? If the outside grows does this mean that the inside is changing too? Children love to it when they start to grow! The only thing better than being four is being four and a half! But they also have questions, and maybe even worry a little. READ MORE

The Tooth Mouse

Written by Susan Hood (author), Janice Nadeau (illustrator) | August 1, 2012
In many countries around the world, there is no such thing as the Tooth Fairy. Instead, there is the Tooth Mouse! This modern fable, set in Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, tells how an aging French Tooth Mouse names her successor. READ MORE

Bride of New France

Written by Suzanne Desrochers | August, 2012
A Canadian bestseller, this richly imagined novel is about a young French woman sent to settle in the New World. READ MORE

The Flirt Formula

Written by Anne Portugal, translated by Jean-Jacques Poucel | July 24, 2012
The poems go two by two across facing pages, where they press against each other, connect, and go forth in a tremulous manifesto. The result is a syntactical vertigo poised above nothingness. The halves meet only in an instant, suggesting that the crux of poetry is the art of not quite touching. READ MORE

Love and Justice as Competences

Written by Luc Boltanski | July 2012
People care a great deal about justice. They protest and engage in confrontations with others when their sense of justice is affronted or disturbed. When they do this, they don’t generally act in a strategic or calculating way but use arguments that claim a general validity. READ MORE

The Flirt Formula

Written by Anne Portugal | Translated by Jean-Jacques Poucel | July 2012
The poems go two by two across facing pages, where they press against each other, connect, and go forth in a tremulous manifesto. The result is a syntactical vertigo poised above nothingness. The halves meet only in an instant, suggesting that the crux of poetry is the art of not quite touching. READ MORE

The Gift

Written by Florence Noivile | Translated by Catherine Temerson | June 30, 2012
This moving fictional memoir begins as a woman heads home after a meeting regarding her inheritance. Rebeling against the legalese uttered by the attorney, her mind drifts back to her childhood and she sees her life with sudden clarity. On the train, she jots down a few notes, which prompt the poetic outpouring of memory and emotion that make up this delicate novel. READ MORE

Black France / France Noire: The History and Politics of Blackness

Written by Trica Danielle Keaton | June 26, 2012
In Black France / France Noire, scholars, activists, and novelists from France and the United States address the untenable paradox at the heart of French society. France's constitutional and legal discourses do not recognize race as a meaningful category. READ MORE

Lovers

Written by Daniel Arsand
At the court of Louis XV, Sébastien, a handsome fifteen year old boy versed in the medicinal arts, meets the nobleman Balthazar de Créon. De Créon, struck by the boy’s beauty and his talents as a healer, orders Sébastien to his manor a few months later so he can instruct him in the ways of the court, hoping thus to install him as Louis XV’s surgeon. READ MORE

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