Snow Day

Written by Pierre Wazem | Illustrated by Aubin | Translated by Mark Bence

An icy poetic crime tale set in America’s heartland.

An outsider sheriff struggles to find his place in an isolated, snow-covered town populated by a hard people who are set in their ways and don’t take too kindly to strangers. It's a place where folks mind their own business — however odd it may be — and do as they please. That is, until the calm, quiet sheriff decides to do his job…

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The Pen and the Brush: How Passion for Art Shaped Nineteenth-Century French Novels

Written by Anka Muhlstein | Other Press | January 31, 2017
A scintillating glimpse into the lives of acclaimed writers and artists and their inspiring, often surprising convergences, from the author of "Monsieur Proust’s Library". READ MORE

Malala Activist for Girls' Education

Written by Raphaëlle Frier | Illustrated by Aurélia Fronty | Translated by Julie Cormier

Malala's voice is loud and strong and is for all girls around the world.

Malala Yousafzai stood up to the Taliban and fought for the right for all girls to receive an education. When she was just fifteen-years-old, the Taliban attempted to kill Malala, but even this did not stop her activism. At age eighteen Malala became the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work to ensure the education of all children around the world.

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Red: The History of a Color

Written by Michel Pastoureau | Translated by Gladding Jody

The color red has represented many things, from the life force and the divine to love, lust, and anger. Up through the Middle Ages, red held a place of privilege in the Western world. For many cultures, red was not just one color of many but rather the only color worthy enough to be used for social purposes. In some languages, the word for red was the same as the word for color. The first color developed for painting and dying, red became associated in antiquity with war, wealth, and power.

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Radiant Terminus

Written by Antoine Volodine | Translated by Jeffrey Zuckerman

The most patently sci-fi work of Antoine Volodine’s to be translated into English, Radiant Terminus takes place in a Tarkovskian landscape after the fall of the Second Soviet Union. Most of humanity has been destroyed thanks to a number of nuclear meltdowns, but a few communes remain, including one run by Solovyei, a psychotic father with the ability to invade people’s dreams—including those of his daughters—and torment them for thousands of years.

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Moby Dick

Written by Herman Melville and Christophe Chabouté

A masterful adaptation of the timeless literary classic, faithfully and beautifully rendered by an award-winning artist. In striking black-and-white illustrations, Chabouté retells the story of the great American novel in which Captain Ahab strikes out on a voyage, obsessively seeking revenge on the great white whale that took his leg.

* Foreword by John Arcudi.

* A literary classic, adapted by award-winning artist Christophe Chabouté.

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Radicalization: Why Some People Choose the Path of Violence

Written by Farhad Khosrokhavar | Translated by Jane Marie Todd
In the wake of the Paris, San Bernadino, and Brussels terrorist attacks, fears over “homegrown terrorism” have surfaced to a degree not seen since September 11, 2001—especially following the news that all of the perpetrators in Paris were European citizens. A sought-after commentator in France and a widely respected international scholar of radical Islam, Farhad Khosrokhavar has spent years studying the path toward radicalization, focusing particularly on the key role of prisons as incubators of a particular brand of outrage that has yielded so many attacks over the past decade. READ MORE

Montaigne: A Life

Written by Philippe Desan | Translated by Steven Rendall and Lisa Neal
One of the most important writers and thinkers of the Renaissance, Michel de Montaigne helped invent a literary genre that seemed more modern than anything that had come before. But did he do it, as he suggests in his Essays, by retreating to his chateau, turning his back on the world, and stoically detaching himself from his violent times? In this definitive biography, Philippe Desan, one of the world’s leading authorities on Montaigne, overturns this longstanding myth by showing that Montaigne was constantly concerned with realizing his political ambitions—and that the literary and philosophical character of the Essays largely depends on them. READ MORE

Jean Renoir: A Biography

Written by Pascal Mérigeau | Foreword by Martin Scorsese | Translated by Bruce Benderson
Originally published in France in 2012, Pascal Mérigeau’s definitive biography of legendary film director Jean Renoir is a landmark work—a study of one of the most fascinating and creative artistic figures of the twentieth century. READ MORE

The Ecology of Attention

Written by Yves Citton | translated by Barnaby Norman

Information overload, the shallows, weapons of mass distraction, the googlization of minds: countless commentators condemn the flood of images and information that dooms us to a pathological attention deficit.

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Barthes: A Biography

Written by Tiphaine Samoyault | Translated by Andrew Brown | Foreworded by Jonathan Culler

Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was a central figure in the thought of his time, but he was also something of an outsider. His father died in the First World War, he enjoyed his mother’s unfailing love, he spent long years in the sanatorium, and he was aware of his homosexuality from an early age: all this soon gave him a sense of his own difference. He experienced the great events of contemporary history from a distance. However, his life was caught up in the violent, intense sweep of the twentieth century, a century that he helped to make intelligible.

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Earthlight: Poems

Written by André Breton | Translated by Bill Zavatsky and Zack Rogow

Best known in the United States as the mastermind of the Surrealist movement and as the author of Nadja, André Breton has always enjoyed in Europe the reputation of being a brilliant poet as well. Bill Zavatsky's and Zack Rogow's award winning translation of Breton's Earthlight (Clair de terre) introduces the English-language audience to the delights―and complexities―of Breton's amazing poetry.

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