Words on Screen

Written by Michel Chion | Edited and translated by Claudia Gorbman

Michel Chion is well known in contemporary film studies for his innovative investigations into aspects of cinema that scholars have traditionally overlooked. Following his work on sound in film in Audio-Vision and Film, a Sound Art, Words on Screen is Chion's survey of everything the seventh art gives us to read on screen.

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Who You Think I Am

Written by Camille Laurens | Translated by Adriana Hunter

In a vertiginous play between fantasy and virtual reality, Camille Laurens relates the dangerous liaisons of a woman who refuses to give up on desire.

This is the story of Claire Millecam, a forty-eight-year-old teacher and divorcee who creates a fake social media profile to try to keep tabs on Joe, her occasional, elusive, and inconstant lover. Under the false identity of Claire Antunes, a young and beautiful twenty-four-year-old, she starts a correspondence with Chris—pseudonym KissChris—which soon turns into an Internet love affair.

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I Am Sarcey

Written by Alphonse Allais | translated by Doug Skinner

Francisque Sarcey was the most influential drama critic in 1890s Paris — and the most conservative. He famously dismissed Alfred Jarry‘s Ubu Roi as “a filthy fraud that deserves nothing but the silence of contempt.” The brilliant humorist Alphonse Allais transformed Sarcey into an Ubuesque piñata in a series of columns published under Sarcey’s name in the newspaper Le Chat Noir.

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The Hunt

Written by Margaux Othats

A young girl builds and rebuilds a sculpture out of rocks she finds strewn around as two hunters repeatedly shoot her creation to bits. As the girl perseveres, though, what she creates becomes a testament to the creative spirit and a condemnation of violence.

At its core, The Hunt by Margaux Othats is a meditation on the power of creativity and endurance over the forces of destruction. It's also a visual memo on girl power!

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Gauguin: The Other World

Written by Fabrizio Dori | Translated by Edward Gauvin

In 1891, Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) arrives on the French Polynesian island of Tahiti. In this lush paradise, he is liberated from the concerns of the city-dwelling European. He is free: to love, to sing, and to create. In Copenhagen, Gauguin’s wife enjoys no such freedom. She would rather forget her odious husband and his degenerate artwork. Instead, in a city resistant to the avant-garde, she is tasked with selling a collection of his extravagantly priced Tahitian paintings.

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The Table

Written by Francis Ponge | Translated, with an introduction, by Colombina Zamponi

Written over a series of early mornings from 1967 to 1973 in his seclusion at his country home, Mas des Vergers, The Table was Francis Ponge’s final text and offers a final chapter in his endless interrogation of the unassuming objects in his life: in this case, the table upon which he wrote. In his labored employment of words to destroy words and get at the presence lying beneath his elbow, Ponge charts out a space of silent consolation that lies beyond (and challenges) scientific objectivity and poetic transport.

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Jazz and Palm Wine

Written by Emmanuel Dongala | Translated and with a foreword by Dominic Thomas
Jazz, aliens, and witchcraft collide in this collection of short stories by renowned author Emmanuel Dongala. The influence of Kongo culture is tangible throughout, as customary beliefs clash with party conceptions of scientific and rational thought.
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Deep in the Forest

Written by Josef Antòn | Illustrated by Lucie Brunellière

Deep in the forest, early in the morning, the animals slowly wake—except the panda, who is sleeping in. The monkey stretches, the red ant hides, the black bear yawns, and the gazelle smiles. But where is the okapi? Can you find it?

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The Kingdom

Written by Emmanuel Carrère | Translated by John Lambert

A sweeping fictional account of the early Christians, whose unlikely beliefs conquered the world

Gripped by the tale of a Messiah whose blood we drink and body we eat, the genre-defying author Emmanuel Carrère revisits the story of the early Church in his latest work. With an idiosyncratic and at times iconoclastic take on the charms and foibles of the Church fathers, Carrère ferries readers through his “doors” into the biblical narrative. Once inside, he follows the ragtag group of early Christians through the tumultuous days of the faith’s founding.

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A Night of Philosophy and Ideas Draws Thousands

Written by
A Night of Philosophy and Ideas took place in New York on January 28th. This festive event organized by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the Brooklyn Public Library gathered more than 7,000 people, from 7pm to 7am! READ MORE

Harvest of Skulls

Written by Abdourahman A. Waberi | Translated by Dominic Thomas

In 1994, the akazu, Rwandan’s political elite, planned the genocidal mass slaughter of 500,000 to 1,000,000 Tutsi and Hutu who lived in the country. Given the failure of the international community to acknowledge the genocide, in 1998, ten African authors visited Rwanda in a writing initiative that was an attempt to make partial amends. In this multidimensional novel, Abdourahman A. Waberi claims, "Language remains inadequate in accounting for the world and all its turpitudes, words can never be more than unstable crutches, staggering along...

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California Dreamin'

Written by Pénélope Bagieu | Translated by Nanette Cooper-McGuinness

Before she became the legendary Mama Cass—one quarter of the mega-huge folk group The Mamas and the Papas—Cass Eliot was a girl from Baltimore trying to make it in the big city. After losing parts to stars like Barbra Streisand on the Broadway circuit, Cass found her place in the music world with an unlikely group of cohorts.

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