Surrealist texts

Written by Gisèle Prassinos | translated by Ellen Nations
Surrealist texts
by Gisèle Prassinos
translated by Ellen Nations
(Black Scat Books, January 2014)

This book features 20 transformative texts by Gisèle Prassinos one of Surrealism’s most gifted voices. The very appreciated automatic writing process was used to write these fabulous texts. Prassino's strange poems are tainted with cruelty as some said, but most of all with caring innocence.

Gisèle Prassinos was discovered at age 14 by André Breton. He included her poetry in his seminal Anthologie de l’humour noir (1940) and commented: “The tone of Gisèle Prassinos is unique: all the poets are jealous of it.”

Her haunting, childlike style is unrivaled and her timeless stories. These inspired translations by Ellen Nations will dazzle and surprise you.

This limited edition includes eight original watercolor paintings by artist Bruce Hutchinson.

"Nations’s translations admirably resist the urge to clarify or normalize Prassinos’s surrealist prose. Complemented by Bruce Hutchinson’s beautiful watercolors in a limited edition of only 85 copies,Surrealist Texts makes a lovely gift for connoisseurs of surrealism. But the significance of this collection extends beyond its historical value. Like most surrealist literature, the stories are strange and even off-putting on the surface, but plumbing their depths reveals repressed truths, hidden within the subconscious, that are no less painful or true than when they were written."
—Lucina Schell, Reading in translation

More info: Black Scat Books

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