Struggle and Utopia at the End Times of Philosophy

Written by François Laruelle
Struggle and Utopia at the End Times of Philosophy
by François Laruelle
(Univocal publishing, 2012)

Very few thinkers have traveled the heretical path that François Laruelle walks between philosophy and non-philosophy. For Laruelle, the future of philosophy is problematic, but a mutation of its functions is possible. Up until now, philosophy has merely been a utopia concerned with the past and only provided the services of its conservation. We must introduce a rigorous and non-imaginary practice of a utopia in action, a philo-fiction – a close relative to science-fiction. From here we can see the double meaning of the watchword, a tabula rasa of the future. This new destination is imposed by a specifically human Messianism, an eschatology within the limits of the Man-in-person as anti-humanist ultimatum addressed to the History of Philosophy. Platonism, Eastern and Western Christianities, gnosis, form the context of the discussion of this program. This book elucidates some of the fundamental problems of non-philosophy and takes on its detractors. The thinking that takes place under the name of the Name-of-Man has to be defended.

Univocal publishing

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