Paris, Line by Line

Written by Robinson
Paris, Line by Line
by Robinson
(Universe, March 19, 2013)

In the early 1960s, Robinson, an illustrator celebrated for his drawings of buildings, documented Paris in his signature style. More than forty years after its original publication, Paris, Line by Line returns to print. Page after page is filled with Robinson’s beautiful, precise drawings: be it an aerial view of the Right Bank, the hustle and bustle of the Champs-Élysées, or a show at the Moulin Rouge, Robinson’s meticulous recreations perfectly capture what makes Paris such a beloved destination.

Born Werner Kruse, Robinson became well known for his beautifully detailed line drawings of cities and his X-ray-like manner of drawing building interiors. Although today’s illustrators owe a great debt to this line-drawing trailblazer, Robinson’s numerous illustrated city guides have been out of print for some time. With the re-release of his 1967 book New York, Line by Line (Universe, 2009), an entirely new generation was able to experience this illustrator’s magical work.

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