Our Daily Poison

Written by Marie-Monique Robin, Translated by Allison Schein and Lara Vergnaud
by Marie-Monique Robin
Translated by Allison Schein and Lara Vergnaud
The New Press, 2014

From Pesticides to Packaging: How Chemicals Have Contaminated the Food Chain and Are Making Us Sick

Over the past thirty years, we have seen an increase in rates of cancer, neurodegenerative disease, reproductive disorders, and diabetes, particularly in developed countries. At the same time, since the end of World War II, approximately 100,000 synthetic chemical molecules have invaded our environment—and our food chain. In Our Daily Poison, award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker Marie-Monique Robin investigates the links between these two alarming trends, revealing how corporate interests and our ignorance may be costing us our lives.

The result of a rigorous two-year investigation that took Robin across North America, Europe, and Asia, Our Daily Poison documents the many ways in which we encounter a shocking array of chemicals in our everyday lives—from the pesticides that blanket our crops to the additives and plastics that contaminate our food—and their effects on our bodies over time. Gathering as evidence scientific studies, testimonies of international regulatory agencies, and interviews with farmworkers suffering from acute chronic poisoning, Robin makes a compelling case for action.

Marie-Monique Robin

Marie-Monique Robin is an award-winning journalist and filmmaker. She received the 1995 Albert-Londres Prize, awarded to investigative journalists in France.

praise
“Terrifying . . . [Robin] conducts her investigation with an Olympian calm and reveals deep structural problems.”
—L’Express

More info

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.
Sign in or register to post comments.

More new titles

new titles

Louis I, King of the Sheep

Louis’s increasingly elaborate fantasy of what comes with being a supreme ruler: the pleasures, the responsibilities, the capriciousness. “What’s good for me is good for my people,” thinks King Louis in this clever fable about the randomness and absurdity of power, but also its abuses, and the hidden dangers in a society built on conformity.
new titles

Inside a Pearl: My Years in Paris

When Edmund White moved to Paris in 1983, leaving New York City in the midst of the AIDS crisis, he was forty-three years old, couldn’t speak French, and only knew two people in the entire city. But in middle age, he discovered the new anxieties and pleasures of mastering a new culture.
new titles

Violet Blood of the Amethyst

Le Sang violet de l'améthyste, published posthumously in 1998, exemplifies the rich and extremely diverse work of Louis Calaferte, one of the most original and controversial writers of 20th-century France. Here, in seemingly random order, are poems, memories, philosophical speculations, quotations, addresses to the reader, erotic descriptions, alchemical concepts, childhood scenes and, most surprisingly, short monologues of Polyphemus, the cyclops of Homeric legend.
1/3
MORE IN books
event

The Legacy of Irène Némirovsky with Susan Rubin Suleiman

MARCH 27, 2017 | 7pm
Maison Française of NYU
16 Washington Mews (at University Place)
New York, NY 10003
event

Nature and the Dynamics of Contemporary Capitalism

MARCH 29, 2017 | 4pm-6pm
Wolff Conference Room, Albert and Vera List Academic Center
6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10011, Room D1103