Believing in Order to See

Written by Jean-Luc Marion | Translated by Christina M. Gschwandtner

Jean-Luc Marion is one of the most important philosophers for the contemporary study of religion.

Believing in Order to See On the Rationality of Revelation and the Irrationality of Some Believers explores the questions of Catholic identity and the interplay of faith and reason in a clear manner, making it easily accessible to those without philosophical training.

It might also be of value to anyone interested Catholic education's contribution to intellectual life.

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The True Life

Written by Alain Badiou | Translated by Susan Spitzer

The True Life: A Plea for Corrupting the Young 

'I m 79 years old. Why the devil then should I be spending time talking about youth?'

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The Japanese and the War

Written by Michael Lucken | Translated by Karen Grimwade

Memories of World War II exert a powerful influence over Japan's culture and society. In The Japanese and the War Expectation, Perception, and the Shaping of Memory, Michael Lucken details how World War II manifested in the literature, art, film, funerary practices, and education reform of the time.

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Words on Screen

Written by Michel Chion | Edited and translated by Claudia Gorbman

Michel Chion is well known in contemporary film studies for his innovative investigations into aspects of cinema that scholars have traditionally overlooked. Following his work on sound in film in Audio-Vision and Film, a Sound Art, Words on Screen is Chion's survey of everything the seventh art gives us to read on screen.

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The Table

Written by Francis Ponge | Translated, with an introduction, by Colombina Zamponi

Written over a series of early mornings from 1967 to 1973 in his seclusion at his country home, Mas des Vergers, The Table was Francis Ponge’s final text and offers a final chapter in his endless interrogation of the unassuming objects in his life: in this case, the table upon which he wrote. In his labored employment of words to destroy words and get at the presence lying beneath his elbow, Ponge charts out a space of silent consolation that lies beyond (and challenges) scientific objectivity and poetic transport.

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The Pen and the Brush: How Passion for Art Shaped Nineteenth-Century French Novels

Written by Anka Muhlstein | Other Press | January 31, 2017
A scintillating glimpse into the lives of acclaimed writers and artists and their inspiring, often surprising convergences, from the author of "Monsieur Proust’s Library". READ MORE

Red: The History of a Color

Written by Michel Pastoureau | Translated by Gladding Jody

The color red has represented many things, from the life force and the divine to love, lust, and anger. Up through the Middle Ages, red held a place of privilege in the Western world. For many cultures, red was not just one color of many but rather the only color worthy enough to be used for social purposes. In some languages, the word for red was the same as the word for color. The first color developed for painting and dying, red became associated in antiquity with war, wealth, and power.

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Radicalization: Why Some People Choose the Path of Violence

Written by Farhad Khosrokhavar | Translated by Jane Marie Todd
In the wake of the Paris, San Bernadino, and Brussels terrorist attacks, fears over “homegrown terrorism” have surfaced to a degree not seen since September 11, 2001—especially following the news that all of the perpetrators in Paris were European citizens. A sought-after commentator in France and a widely respected international scholar of radical Islam, Farhad Khosrokhavar has spent years studying the path toward radicalization, focusing particularly on the key role of prisons as incubators of a particular brand of outrage that has yielded so many attacks over the past decade. READ MORE

Montaigne: A Life

Written by Philippe Desan | Translated by Steven Rendall and Lisa Neal
One of the most important writers and thinkers of the Renaissance, Michel de Montaigne helped invent a literary genre that seemed more modern than anything that had come before. But did he do it, as he suggests in his Essays, by retreating to his chateau, turning his back on the world, and stoically detaching himself from his violent times? In this definitive biography, Philippe Desan, one of the world’s leading authorities on Montaigne, overturns this longstanding myth by showing that Montaigne was constantly concerned with realizing his political ambitions—and that the literary and philosophical character of the Essays largely depends on them. READ MORE

Jean Renoir: A Biography

Written by Pascal Mérigeau | Foreword by Martin Scorsese | Translated by Bruce Benderson
Originally published in France in 2012, Pascal Mérigeau’s definitive biography of legendary film director Jean Renoir is a landmark work—a study of one of the most fascinating and creative artistic figures of the twentieth century. READ MORE

The Ecology of Attention

Written by Yves Citton | translated by Barnaby Norman

Information overload, the shallows, weapons of mass distraction, the googlization of minds: countless commentators condemn the flood of images and information that dooms us to a pathological attention deficit.

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Barthes: A Biography

Written by Tiphaine Samoyault | Translated by Andrew Brown | Foreworded by Jonathan Culler

Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was a central figure in the thought of his time, but he was also something of an outsider. His father died in the First World War, he enjoyed his mother’s unfailing love, he spent long years in the sanatorium, and he was aware of his homosexuality from an early age: all this soon gave him a sense of his own difference. He experienced the great events of contemporary history from a distance. However, his life was caught up in the violent, intense sweep of the twentieth century, a century that he helped to make intelligible.

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