The Man in a Hurry

Written by Paul Morand; Euan Cameron (translator)
Written by Paul Morand
Translated by Euan Cameron

Pushkin Press, September 2015

No one can keep up with Pierre Niox, the speediest antiques dealer in Paris, although not necessarily the most competent. As he dashes about at a dizzying pace, his impatience becomes too much to bear for those around him; his manservant, his only friend and even his cat abandon him. He begins to find that while he is racing through life, it is passing him by. However, when he falls in love with the languid, unpunctual Hedwige, the man in a hurry has to learn how to slow down...

The Man in a Hurry was reviewed in July, 24th Publishers' Weekly edition:

"(...) Pushkin Press’s gorgeous new edition of Morand’s masterpiece, written in 1941, is a shockingly clever farce. (...) This is a strange book, written in prose as speedy as its impossible hero, and Morand deserves to be widely revisited both for the ageless appeal of his style and the specific (sometimes worrying) portrait of human nature at war with 1940s modernity." - Publishers' Weekly, 07.24.2015

About the author

Paul Morand was born in Paris in 1888. After studying at the École des Sciences Politiques he joined the diplomatic corps, serving in London, Rome, Berne and Bucharest. Tender Shoots , his first collection of stories, was introduced by Marcel Proust. In a long and busy life, he found time to write poetry, novels, short stories and travel books. Morand was made a member of the Académie Française in 1963 and died in 1976. His books Hecate and Her Dogs, Tender Shoots, Venices and The Allure of Chanel are also published by Pushkin Press.

Praise for The Man in a Hurry!

"Probably the best French writer of the twentieth century after Proust and Céline" - Philippe Sollers

"Morand was the all-round aesthete." - Nicholas Lezard, Guardian

"Admired both by Ezra Pound and by Marcel Proust as a pioneer craftsman of Modernist French prose (...) The sheer shapeliness of his prose recalls Hemingway; the urbanity of his self-destructiveness compares with Fitzgerald's; and his camera eye is as lucidly stroboscopic as that of Dos Passos." - The New York Times

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