Guys Like Me

Written by Dominique Fabre; Howard Curtis (Translator)
Written by Dominique Fabre
Translated by Howard Curtis

New Vessel Press, February 2015.

A 2014 French Voices Award Winner.

Dominique Fabre, born in Paris and a lifelong resident of the city, exposes the shadowy, anonymous lives of many who inhabit the French capital. In this quiet, subdued tale, a middle-aged office worker, divorced and alienated from his only son, meets up with two childhood friends who are similarly adrift, without passions or prospects. He’s looking for a second act to his mournful life, seeking the harbor of love and a true connection with his son. Set in palpably real Paris streets that feel miles away from the City of Light, Guys Like Me is a stirring novel of regret and absence, yet not without a glimmer of hope.

Praise

“Readers will take pleasure in this well-told tale with a satisfying ending.”
Publishers Weekly

“The setting may be Paris, but it’s not the Paris of grand avenues and pricey cafés. In fact, Fabre’s hero is a recognizable everyman, from any country.”
Library Journal

“Fabre speaks to us of luck and misfortune, of the accidents that make a man or defeat him. He talks about our ordinary disappointments and our small moments of calm. Fabre is the discreet megaphone of the man in the crowd.”
Elle

“A smile like a soft flash of light … travels through this moving novel and tells, in words that are muted and profoundly humane, of life as it is.”
Le Monde

“In this novel one finds the intimate geography of an author who lays bare the essence of Paris and its outskirts.”
La Quinzaine littéraire

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