Are You A Monkey?

Written by Marine Rivoal | Translated by Maria Tunney
Phaidon | April 24, 2017

A game of animal charades that will leave readers guessing and giggling

A crocodile sticks his head in the sand and asks his friends to guess which animal he is mimicking. A turn of the page reveals the answer: an ostrich! Next, the ostrich curls her long neck and shoots water from her mouth. Whom is she imitating? An elephant! Readers are a part of the game, wagering guesses before turning the page to find the often unexpected reveal. Painted in a stylish and saturated color palette of Pantones, this unusual book will engage children in considering animal behavior and characteristics. With an unexpectedly poignant ending, this informational yet artful storybook is unlike any before it.

Born in 1987, Marine Rivoal graduated from the École Estienne, and continued her studies at the Arts Décoratifs school in Strasbourg, where she deepened her knowledge of engraving and began to experiment with the different printing techniques she used for this book. Marine is based in Lyon, France. This is her second book, and her first with Phai

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